Tag Archives for " electricity news "

Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasers

One of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or ‘doped,’ with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired laser light with less stimulation and energy loss.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171016132644.htm

Detailed look at 2-D structure of turbulence in tokamaks

A key hurdle for fusion researchers is understanding turbulence, the ripples and eddies that can cause the superhot plasma that fuels fusion reactions to leak heat and particles and keep fusion from taking place. Comprehending and reducing turbulence will facilitate the development of fusion as a safe, clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity from power plants around the world.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171014111736.htm

Spin current detection in quantum materials unlocks potential for alternative electronics

A new method that precisely measures the mysterious behavior and magnetic properties of electrons flowing across the surface of quantum materials could open a path to next-generation electronics. A team of scientists has developed an innovative microscopy technique to detect the spin of electrons in topological insulators, a new kind of quantum material that could be used in applications such as spintronics and quantum computing.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171013123159.htm

Converting carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide using water, electricity

Researchers have determined how electrocatalysts can convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide using water and electricity. The discovery can lead to the development of efficient electrocatalysts for large scale production of synthesis gas — a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171012200218.htm

Injecting electrons jolts 2-D structure into new atomic pattern

The same electrostatic charge that can make hair stand on end and attach balloons to clothing could be an efficient way to drive atomically thin electronic memory devices of the future, according to a new study. Scientists have found a way to reversibly change the atomic structure of a 2-D material by injecting it with electrons. The process uses far less energy than current methods for changing the configuration of a material’s structure.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171011131727.htm

Building a barrier against oxidation

Chemically stabilizing atomically flat materials improves their potential for commercial application, report scientists.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171009161110.htm

Paper-based supercapacitor uses metal nanoparticles to boost energy density

Using a simple layer-by-layer coating technique, researchers have developed a paper-based flexible supercapacitor that could be used to help power wearable devices. The device uses metallic nanoparticles to coat cellulose fibers in the paper, creating supercapacitor electrodes with high energy and power densities — and the best performance so far in a textile-based supercapacitor.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171005121053.htm

New ‘molecular trap’ cleans more radioactive waste from nuclear fuel rods

A new method for capturing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants is cheaper and more effective than current methods, a potential boon for the energy industry, according to new research.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171005111057.htm

Using elastomer films to generate electricity

Water is still the most important source of renewable energy in Bavaria, Germany, accounting for some 33 percent of all renewable energy produced in the region, as showed by the Bavarian Energy Map. But conventional hydroelectric plants, especially micro hydro generators, are a subject of controversy due to their low output volumes and their interference with the ecosystem. Researchers are working on an environmentally friendly alternative: in the future, innovative elastomer materials are set to convert the mechanical energy produced by flowing water in small rivers directly into electrical energy.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171005103533.htm

New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

A new hybrid nanomaterial harvests solar energy and uses it to extract hydrogen from seawater, cheaply and efficiently. Future commercialization could mean a new source of environmentally friendly fuel and less dependence on fossil fuels.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171004162013.htm

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