Graphene paves the way to faster high-speed optical communications

Researchers created a technology that could lead to new devices for faster, more reliable ultra-broad bandwidth transfers. For the first time, researchers demonstrated how electrical fields boost the non-linear optical effects of graphene.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180521131558.htm

Robotic assembly of the world’s smallest house — Even a mite doesn’t fit through the door!

A nanorobotics team has assembled a new microrobotics system that pushes forward the frontiers of optical nanotechnologies. Combining several existing technologies, the newly developed nanofactory builds microstructures in a large vacuum chamber and fixes components onto optical fiber tips with nanometer accuracy. The microhouse construction demonstrates how researchers can advance optical sensing technologies when they manipulate ion guns, electron beams and finely controlled robotic piloting.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180518102729.htm

3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater, moves objects

Engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater and grabs objects and moves them. The watery creation could lead to soft robots that mimic sea animals like the octopus, which can walk underwater and bump into things without damaging them. It may also lead to artificial heart, stomach and other muscles, along with devices for diagnosing diseases, detecting and delivering drugs and performing underwater inspections.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180518081910.htm

New catalyst upgrades greenhouse gas into renewable hydrocarbons

Engineers have designed a most efficient and stable process for converting climate-warming carbon dioxide into a key chemical building block for plastics — all powered using renewable electricity.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180517143614.htm

The first wireless flying robotic insect takes off

Engineers have created RoboFly, the first wireless flying robotic insect. RoboFly is slightly heavier than a toothpick and is powered by a laser beam.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180515142516.htm

World’s fastest water heater — 100,000 degrees in 0.000 000 000 000 075 seconds

Scientists have turned a powerful X-ray laser into the world’s fastest water heater, reaching 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond (millionth of a millionth of a second). The experiment produced an exotic state of water, from which researchers hope to learn more about the peculiar characteristics of Earth’s most important liquid.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180514151923.htm

Profiling extreme beams: Scientists devise new diagnostic for particle accelerators

The world’s cutting-edge particle accelerators are pushing the extremes in high-brightness beams and ultrashort pulses to explore matter in new ways. To optimize their performance — and to prepare for next-generation facilities that will push these extremes further — scientists have devised a new tool that can measure how bright these beams are, even for pulses that last only quadrillionths or even quintillionths of a second.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180510145942.htm

Apple invests $10M in greenhouse gas-free aluminum smelting

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard joined key execs from Apple and industrial manufacturers Alcoa and Rio Tinto to announce a new process for smelting aluminum that removes greenhouse gases from the equation.

Alcoa and Rio Tinto are creating a joint venture in based in Montreal called Elysis, to help mainstream the process, with plans to make it commercially available by 2024. Along with swapping carbon for oxygen as a byproduct of the production process, the technology is also expected to reduce costs by around 15 percent.

It’s easy to see why Apple jumped at investing into tech here, pumping $13 million CAD ($10 million USD) into the venture. The company has been making a big push over the past couple of years to reduce its carbon footprint across the board. This time last month, Apple announced that it had moved to 100-percent clean energy for its global facilitates.

“Apple is committed to advancing technologies that are good for the planet and help protect it for generations to come,” Tim Cook said in a release tied to today’s news. “We are proud to be part of this ambitious new project, and look forward to one day being able to use aluminum produced without direct greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacturing of our products.”

Those companies, along with the Governments of Canada and Quebec have combined to invest a full $188 million CAD in the forward looking tech. While the new business will be headquartered in Montreal, U.S. manufacturing will also get a piece of the pie. Alcoa has been smelting metal through the process at a smaller scale in a plant outside of Pittsburgh since 2009.

Precision measurement of the proton’s weak charge narrows the search for new physics

A new result from the Q-weak experiment provides a precision test of the weak force, one of four fundamental forces in nature. The proton’s weak charge was found to be QWp=0.0719±0.0045, in excellent agreement with Standard Model predictions. Because the proton’s weak charge is so precisely predicted in this model, the new Q-weak result provides insight into predictions of hitherto unobserved heavy particles.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180509135359.htm

Microwaved plastic increases lithium-sulfur battery lifespan

Engineers have figured out a way to tackle plastic landfills while also improving batteries — by putting ink-free plastic soaked in sulfur-containing solvent into a microwave, and then into batteries as a carbon scaffold.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180509121546.htm

1 4 5 6 7 8 36