Surprising discovery could lead to better batteries

Scientists have observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing. This discovery is a major step toward improving the battery life of consumer electronics.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180112151219.htm

Aerial vehicle flying freely with independently controlled main wings

Professor Dongsoo Har and his team in Cho Chun Shik Graduate School of Green Transportation in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) lately developed an aerial vehicle that is able to control the main wings separately and independently.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180112090847.htm

Here’s what it’s like to ride in Byton’s new Concept SUV

 Byton’s electric concept car wowed at CES, and for good reason. The SUV has a lot of strong features, including a max range of 323 miles for the upgraded version, and a starting price of just $45,000. But the real jaw-dropping feature is a 49-inch display that covers the entire dash, providing a multifunctional information and entertainment interface unlike anything else in the… Read More

Multiresponsive nanosurfactant constructs tiny chemical factory

Scientists have made a surfactant based on nanoparticle dimers, which is responsive to multiple stimuli. The nanosurfactant combines several characteristics of each ‘active’ molecular surfactant which allows a tremendous flexibility whereby liquid droplets can be manipulated.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180110131506.htm

The atomic dynamics of rare everlasting electric fields

Researchers have discovered the atomic mechanisms that give the unusual material yttrium manganite its rare magnetic and electric properties. All it took was ricocheting neutrons off the atoms of a sample of the material heated to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180110112908.htm

Sun, wind, and power trading

The use of renewables like the sun and wind can cause fluctuations in power grids. But what impact do these fluctuations have on security of supply? To answer this question, scientists analyzed different types of fluctuations in several power grids in Europe, Japan, and the USA — and came to surprising conclusions.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180109102803.htm

France probes Apple over iPhone planned obsolescence complaint

 French authorities are investigating whether Apple deliberately slows down older iPhones in order to increase sales, AFP reports. Read More

Toyota’s mobility business shifts into high gear at CES

 Toyota took advantage of CES 2018 to signal a major shift in its business, becoming what company president Akio Toyoda termed a “mobility service company” during his keynote presentation. Toyota seems poised to embrace mobility services as a core part of its overall business, rather than an offshoot or subsidiary concern, based on Toyoda’s comments and the vision of the… Read More

Surprising result shocks scientists studying spin

Scientists analyzing results of spinning protons striking different sized atomic nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) found an odd directional preference in the production of neutrons that switches sides as the size of the nuclei increases. The results offer new insight into the mechanisms affecting particle production in these collisions.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180108121646.htm

VW taps Nvidia to build AI into its new electric microbus and beyond

 Nvidia will power artificial intelligence technology built into its future vehicles, including the new I.D. Buzz, its all-electric retro-inspired camper van concept. The partnership between the two companies also extends to the future vehicles, and will initially focus on so-called “Intelligent Co-Pilot” features, including using sensor data to make driving easier, safer and… Read More

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