Valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies clarified

Many of today’s technologies, such as, solid-state lighting, transistors in computer chips, and batteries in cell phones rely simply on the charge of the electron and how it moves through the material. In certain materials, such as the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), electrons can be selectively placed into a chosen electronic valley using optical excitation.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019121837.htm

New ways to achieve selectivity for biomarkers in bioelectronics

Materials science and engineering researchers have experimentally verified the electrochemical processes that control charge transfer rate from an organic polymer to a biomarker molecule. Their findings may enhance selectivity for biomarkers in bioelectronic devices.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019100946.htm

New material for digital memories of the future

Scientists have developed the first material with conductivity properties that can be switched on and off using ferroelectric polarization.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171018133219.htm

Reducing power plants’ freshwater consumption with new silica filter

Power plants draw more freshwater than any other consumer in the United States, accounting for more than 50 percent of the nation’s freshwater use at about 500 billion gallons daily. To help save this water, researchers have developed a new silica filter for power plant cooling waters that decreases the amount of freshwater power plants consume by increasing the number of times cooling tower water can be reused and recycled.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171018113506.htm

Toyota’s ‘Fine-Comfort Ride’ fuel cell concept aims for long-range flexibility

 Toyota is debuting a new concept vehicle for the forthcoming Tokyo Motor Show, and it’s a fuel cell vehicle that’s designed to get around 1,000 km (around 621 miles) on a single hydrogen pack that can be refuelled in about 3 minutes total. The concept looks like an aggressively future-styled minivan, though it’s billed as a “premium saloon,” and it’s got… Read More

London puts new hybrid electric black cabs on roads ahead of larger rollout

 London is staring up a pilot test of its electric black cabs (via Engadget), otherwise known as the TX5, after first revealing the vehicles back in 2015. The cars have 70 miles of pure EV range on their built-in battery pack, but can also go up to 400 miles using the onboard gas engine to generate the power for the battery and motor. The vehicles meet the conditions for London’s… Read More

Amazon patents a drone that delivers a charge to power up EVs on the go

 A recent Amazon patent could be an answer to range anxiety, albeit one that sounds a bit more sci-fi than practical solution at the moment: the newly granted patent (via Roadshow) describes a drone that could carry a battery charge for electric cars, and deliver them to any cars out on the road that need them while in route, providing enough juice to get to a proper charging station.… Read More

Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasers

One of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or ‘doped,’ with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired laser light with less stimulation and energy loss.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171016132644.htm

Detailed look at 2-D structure of turbulence in tokamaks

A key hurdle for fusion researchers is understanding turbulence, the ripples and eddies that can cause the superhot plasma that fuels fusion reactions to leak heat and particles and keep fusion from taking place. Comprehending and reducing turbulence will facilitate the development of fusion as a safe, clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity from power plants around the world.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171014111736.htm

Spin current detection in quantum materials unlocks potential for alternative electronics

A new method that precisely measures the mysterious behavior and magnetic properties of electrons flowing across the surface of quantum materials could open a path to next-generation electronics. A team of scientists has developed an innovative microscopy technique to detect the spin of electrons in topological insulators, a new kind of quantum material that could be used in applications such as spintronics and quantum computing.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171013123159.htm

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